A Comparative Look at the Asian American Population

 

Census 2000

The Asian-American population has been on a steady rise in the past decade. According to the 2000 census, the total Asian population rose from 6,908,638 in 1990 to 10,242,998 in 2000, a nearly 68 % increase. Asians now make up 4.2 % of the population of the US, compared to 2.8 % in 1990.

64% of the Asian American population is concentrated in two states - California and New York. More than three quarters of the Asian American population lives in 10 states - California, Florida, Hawaii, Illinois, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Texas, Virginia and Washington.

Asian Americans also tend to live in metropolitan areas much more than the rest of the population. While 19% of the total American population lives in non-metropolitan areas, only 4.3% of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders live in non-metropolitan areas. Within the metropolitan areas itself, 47.5% of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders live inside the central city and 48.2% live outside the central city. This, compared to 21.2% and 56.2% respectively for White non-Hispanics.

Asian Americans also tend to have more family-households than non-family households when compared to the national average. About 75.1% of Asian Americans have family-households compared to the national average of 68.8%.

Asian Americans also continued to lead the rest of the population in educational qualification. Nearly 44% of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders have a Bachelors Degree or more compared to 25.6% for the national average, 28% for White non-Hispanics and just 13.8% for others. And over 85% Asian Americans have a high school degree. But discrepancies exist within the Asian American community itself. For example, while over 57% of Indian Americans have a Bachelors Degree or more, only 5% of Hmongs do.

Better education seems to have reflected in better jobs for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Nearly 40% of them are employed in managerial and specialty professions while it is 33.2% for White non-Hispanics and 18.2% for others.

From 1990 to 2000, about 41.5 % of the Asian-American population was foreign born, slightly more than the national average of 39.5%. Asian-Americans also had a higher number of naturalized citizens and non-citizens than the rest of the population. About 12.5% of Asians are naturalized citizens compared to the 9.4% national average and about 65.8% are non-citizens compared to the national average of 57.5%.

Source: Census 2000





 



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